The Newtown Pentacle

Altissima quaeque flumina minimo sono labi

choking gasp

with 4 comments

Great Gallopping Golly Gosh Gee, it’s Wednesday again.

– photo by Mitch Waxman

High over Hunters Point in Long Island City, the POV looks southwards across the Long Island Railroad’s terminal passenger stop on the Lower Montauk line, various incarnations of which have been found here since 1870. In place even longer than the LIRR station, is the intersection of Newtown Creek with its parent waterway East River. Beyond is Greenpoint, which has been there for a good stretch, and that’s Manhattan on the right side of the shot which has also enjoyed a long occupancy hereabouts.

That’s the Williamsburg Bridge at center distant, which has been hanging out over the river since 1903. It’s an immigrant superhighway!

– photo by Mitch Waxman

September of 1954 is when the children of Brooklyn and Queens exploded into revelry over the opening of the Pulaski Bridge. One always refers to the area seen above as “DUPBO” or Down Under the Pulaski Bridge Onramp, opining that “you need to get ahead of the Real Estate guys on this sort of thing or you’ll wind up living in “Westoria” or something.

The Pulaski Bridge is also an immigrant superhighway of sorts, connecting Queens’ Long Island City to Greenpoint in Brooklyn.

– photo by Mitch Waxman

This shot looks northwards, where you can still spot the three major bridges of Western Queens all in one go by peeking over and around the residential towers of LIC. The Queensboro (1909), Hells Gate (1918), and Triborough Bridges (1936).

Tower Town, indeed.


“follow” me on Twitter- @newtownpentacle

Advertisements

4 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. Just two items I find curious:

    “That’s the Williamsburg Bridge at center distant, which has been hanging out over the river since 1903. It’s an immigrant superhighway!”

    “The Pulaski Bridge is also an immigrant superhighway of sorts, connecting Queens’ Long Island City to Greenpoint in Brooklyn.”

    So who are these immigrants and to what foreign country are they emigrating to or from across these bridges?

    Now there are too many sticklers out there who insist that as these two bridges are connecting parts of the Greater City of New York and who make the argument with some credible substantiation that all the aforementioned denizens of Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan (or rather Kaddath) are not only citizens of the City of New York (and the State of New York) but citizens of these United States. All perfectly entitled to cross those spans without displaying their passports and other travel credentials to Immigration and Customs officials.

    So do tell, sir, who are these immigrants?

    Donald Cavaioli
    Caretaker of:
    http://www.custodiasepulchrum.com

    Where this matter may be further debated or a Humble Narrator may give the caretaker some well earned payback.

    Cav

    November 28, 2018 at 1:26 pm

  2. I was 7 years old, and there in 1954 when Mayor Robert Wagner dedicated the Pulaski Bridge. We used to play (unsupervised, no helmets!!) in the demolished buildings that turned Oakland St. into a widened McGuinness Blvd to the bridge. I also remember walking over Newtown Creek on the old Manhattan Ave, Bridge, replaced by the Pulaski Bridge.

    Walt

    November 28, 2018 at 2:24 pm

  3. And once having taken up permanent residence or perhaps citizenship, assuming said individual was originally foreign born, they like any natural born U.S. citizen is just as entitled to move about. That anyone
    already residing here moves between boroughs does not make them an immigrant. Otherwise that would be provincialism raised to maximum sperg out.

    I read your link and yes NYC being a seaport city was always a disembarkation point for newly arrived immigrants (aside: this did not work out well for the American Indians) but once here, one cannot be a double immigrant in the same country let alone the same city and hence is irrelevant to your point.

    Cav

    November 29, 2018 at 1:12 pm


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: